Friday Round-Up: 22 – 25 April

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Here’s what you may have missed at Skills Matter HQ this week!


The Week in Skillscasts

Every week we record the majority of meetups and user groups that come to our offices in London for evening events and talks. These are our Skillscasts – and their all available for free on Skillsmatter.com!

Catherine Breslin talks at Thursday's Women in Data meetup

Catherine Breslin talks at Thursday’s Women in Data meetup

Beginning the week for us, the London Java Community hosted Arun Gupta, the director of RedHat, for a discussion on what’s new in WildFly 8. Arun talked about RedHat’s open source Java EE 7 compliant application server which provides a ‘core’ distribution that is ideal for framework authors.

The London Phonepap & Javascript user group brought two speakers along for an event discussing Nobackend apps with PouchDB and rendering performance using Chrome DevTools. James Nocentini delivered the first talk showing how he built a real offline mobile app and how PouchDB helped him to avoid creating a backend.

Next up Matt Gaunt, a developer advocate for Chrome at Google, hosted a session explaining how to optimise and debug mobile applications with DevTools.

On Wednesday Deep Learning London were joined by Dr. Boumediene Hamzim, a researcher at the Department of Mathematics of Imperial College London, for a talk that delved into machine learning, learning theory and Artificial Neural Networks. The talk explored how we live in an age of data and why it is important to make sense of it using certain frameworks and Artificial Neural Networks to illustrate the thought process.

The Limited WIP Society paid close attention The Theory of Constraints as well as taking a look at the ‘Evaporating Clouds’ at a the first of three talks on Thursday. They considered real life examples, visualising both sides of the conflict and tried to find a better overall solution than just the obvious compromises. As this was a hands-on session, we were unable to film, but you can find out about the next meetup for the Limited WIP Society here.

Women in Data returned to host the second of Thursday’s meetups. Elizabeth Keogh introduced Cynefin, a framework for making sense of the world and its problems. Liz highlighted its uses, like how it can help developers with the use of libraries to avoiding the pitfalls of disorder. Catherine Breslin then covered the basics of speech recognition, and how we use machine learning to model both acoustics of speech and language.

To complete the week, Mark Harwood delivered an In The Brain talk on the open source search and analytics platform, ElasticSearch. Mark, a software engineer at ElasticSearch, demonstrated how anomaly detection algorithms can spot credit card fraud, revealed the UK’s most unexpected hotspot for possessing weapons and how to find movies that urgently need removing from your ‘family friendly’ category!


The Week in Blog

Russ Miles

We talked to Russ Miles about microservices, antifragility, and which books you should be reading and Matias Piipari, CTO of Papers, talked about mobile platforms and app development.


Next Week in Brief

Monday: In The Brain of Luke Hohmann; In The Brain of Shashikant Jagtap; In The Brain of Adam Gundry

Tuesday: Performance and Predictability with the London Java Community; In The Brain of Russ Miles

Wednesday: The graphs of gaming and recruitment with the Neo4J user group; Angular forms and Geospatial Data with Mean Stack

Thursday: Creating Type Providers with the F#unctional Londoners; Talk the walk with Codebar; LMAX Exchange architecture with the London Java Community

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